George Laird's blog

12th European LS-DYNA Conference, Koblenz, Germany

The LS-DYNA Conference in Koblenz, Germany was the usual blend of great presentations and even greater social events.  The location was beautiful and the Conference was especially well-organized by DYNAmore, Germany (co-sponsored with LSTC, Livermore, CA).  Predictive with ENHU, China hosted a morning run event with T-shirts to whoever could show up at 6:45 am.  Besides the run, we had our “booth” to support the LS-DYNA North American Team and on the technology side, we presented two papers: Impact Analysis of Polymeric Additive Manufactured Lattice Structures and Transient Dynamic Implicit Analysis for Durability Testing of Bus Seats.

Predictive Engineering LS-DYNA Nonlinear FEA Consulting Services - Koblenz 2019

Impact Analysis of Additive Manufactured Lattice Structures

We are pleased to announced a year-long contract award from the US Army Natick Soldier Systems Center (NSSC) to continue the investigation of additive manufactured materials for improved blunt force protection in helmet systems.  Our role is to work with Natick’s engineering team to simulate the impact behavior of additive manufactured 3D lattice systems.  In prior work  (see our Case Study: Impact Analysis of Additive Manufactured Lattice Structures) we discovered that getting the material characterization correct was not easy.  In this new work, we’ll revisit that whole process and look into manufacturing variability of the additive materials from bulk samples down to thin noodle-like structures that are necessary to for the 3D lattice structures of the foam replacement pads.

FEA Impact Analysis of Additive Manufactured 3D Lattice Structures for Improved Blunt Force Protection

LSTC Releases LS-DYNA R11.0.0

LSTC Releases LS-DYNA R11.0.0Livermore Software and Technology Company (LSTC), Livermore, CA has recently released LS-DYNA R11.0.0. This release is ready-to-use and is our baseline at Predictive for implicit and explicit work. It is stable and is not a classic xx.0.0 release as is common in the software industry.

Let me explain why: LSTC’s is very transparent about how it develops LS-DYNA and any published release (see release notes.)

So what does this really mean? A released LS-DYNA version is not a “fresh, hot-out-of-the-developers-oven” version of the code. It has gone through months and months, if not years of bug fixes by the development team and user community. The process is quite rigorous, for example, once the LSTC team decides enough-is-enough, a branch is somewhat sealed off from any new major code changes (i.e., R11.xxxxx). While this branch is static, the Development Team continues code development under the designation of Dev_XXXXXX. As the code is fine-tuned and bugs removed, applicable updates are made to the branch and if applicable to prior released versions of the code. At this stage, if the code is deemed ready by the Team, it is run through a suite of verification problems and released to the simulation community. One will note that through-out this whole process, there is no VP of marketing or sales pushing the team to release, it is only released when it is right.

Why LS-DYNA R11.0.0?

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